Recent TASA Programs – Fall 2018

The Textile Appreciation Society of Atlanta offered two events this Fall – 

On September 5, TASA members joined the Japanese friendship group called Tomadachi for a program of Junco Sato Pollack’s solo textile exhibit at the Swan Coach House Art Gallery.  Junco explained her work and techniques.  The two series of works on display were inspired by the Zen spiritual practice of Sutra chanting and internalized stitching as meditation. Junco explained how the repetitive action of chanting and stitching was a metaphor for Sutras, Mantras, breath, life force, and meditation.

On September 6, 2018.  Thailand native,Tip Weniger, hosted and presented TASA’s Fall 2018 program on SE Asian textiles. With knowledge gained from her extensive travel and study of regional textiles and textile design, Tip explained the different weaving techniques and motifs found in textiles from Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar.  Specifically, Tip explained the process of “mudmee” — also known as “ikat,”  supplementary weft and warp weaving, and the exquisite and intricate achiek weaving of Myanmar.  She also reviewed the history of weaving and looms. Throughout the program, Tip shared many beautiful examples of fabrics and fashions modeled by TASA members.  At the conclusion of the program, attendees enjoyed the opportunity to make purchases.

Submitted by Gail Goodwin

 

  

 

 

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TASA Program: Donna Hardy/Indigo in the Southeast U.S.

On Friday, June 1, Lynn Pollard hosted TASA’s summer program on indigo. Indigo authority Donna Hardy gave a history of the plant (the name indigo comes from the country name “India” ) and its use, and explained the different kinds of indigo plants–some are in the legume family; others in the cabbage family.

Donna also shared stories about the cultivation of indigo in the Carolina colonies and Georgia. She talked about various techniques in making indigo dye and showed a picture of an old indigo vat.

Donna is dedicated to preserving the knowledge of indigo production and is envisioning a center to bring all blue-producing plants from around the world together to record and document the ways they are used.
Today synthetic indigo dye is more readily available than natural indigo.

Following Donna’s program, members showed a variety of indigo-dyed fabrics from Indonesia, African countries, and SE Asia.

Submitted by Gail Goodwin

Save the Date! TASA Summer Program – Indigo Presentation by Donna Hardy

Considered one of the premier experts on indigo in America, Donna is currently working with Dr. Brian Ward at Clemson’s Coastal Research and Education center in Charleston doing practical research on the most effective ways to grow indigo. She is also working with a group of engineering students at the University of Georgia to create a new and more efficient way to process indigo. “I’ve been thinking about the importance of preserving this knowledge and have been contemplating that maybe we need a center to bring all of the blue-producing plants from around the world together and record and document the many ways they are used. Create a center for indigo culture, so to speak.”

Date: Friday, June 1, 2018
Time: 10:30 a.m.
Location: Home of Textile Artist/Indigo Dyer Lynn Pollard: 1211 Heritage Ct., 30327
$10 for non-members; 2018 TASA and current SEFAA members free 

RSVP REQUIRED: gvgoodwin@aol.com

For further information on Donna Hardy and Sea Island Indigo see:

2015 Ted Talk

February 2017 Alabama Channin Journal–“Indigo Stories: Donna Hardy of Sea Island Indigo

Submitted by Gail Goodwin

2018 Annual Business Meeting

On February 6, TASA held its annual business meeting at the home of Nancy Hollister.  Future programs discussed include a curated tour of the Bullock Hall quilt exhibit in March. a program on textiles from Ghana and Ivory coast and a program on Indigo dyed cloth.

TASA members brought interesting textiles to share with each other: a double ikat/geringsing piece from Bali, Korean folding cloth/bojagi, a cut and pieced cloth from India, a purse made from potola/double ikat cloth from India, a jacket fashioned from Indian kantha cloth, a celebratory ikat cloth featuring the Dutch queen from Sumba, and a pre-Columbian Huari (500 – 800 AD) head band from Peru.

Durshi Zoberi brought a miscellaneous collection of interesting textiles from India and other countries to sell with proceeds going to charity.

Submitted by Gail Goodwin

Save the Date! TASA’s Fall 2017 Program

Looking ahead to fall, it’s time to save the date for TASA’s FALL, 2017, program at the Carlos Museum.

Professor of Art History and Faculty Curator for Art of the Americas, Rebecca Stone, will give TASA members a tour of the new Art of the Americas exhibit: Threads of Time

Date:  Monday, October 16
Time: 2pm

More info to follow.

Submitted by Gail Goodwin